The Chelsea Flower Show Edit

Wild Flower Card

Wild Flowers Card

It’s time for our favourite annual floral extravaganza- The Chelsea Flower Show  and 2016’s is a petal packed delight. Don’t fret if you didn’t bag tickets we’re bursting with beautiful blooms to share with you.

Since 1982, the Royal Horticulture Society has always named a “Rose of the Year” and we can see why, these fragrant blooms are a regular favourite. Share the romance of this lovely flower with Liane Brookes’s  stunning card.

Roses in Bloom

Roses in Bloom

Each year there is always a memorable poppies tribute, with this year’s provided by Phillip Johnson, keep the memories and sentiment alive with Damian Ward’s delightful photo.

Poppies in Meadow

Poppies in Meadow

What better way to celebrate Harrod’s English eccentrics garden than with these fuchsia foxgloves with their tiny trumpet shaped blooms. Don Hooper‘s snap captures them in all their glory here.

Foxgloves

Foxgloves

For fans of a tipple, you’re not being left in the shade, Cloudy Bay’s garden designed by Sam Ovens is designed to echo the flavours of Sauvignon Blanc. Either way we feel wine and flowers are a great combination and this lovely card by Cat Coquilette is the perfect way to share this sentiment.

Vino Veritas Card

Vino Veritas Card

The Queen’s 90th birthday is also being honoured with a garden of it’s own. Sure to be full of busy lizzie’s and lots of other lovely floral tributes too.

HRH 90th Birthday Card

HRH 90th Birthday Card

The Watahan East & West Garden, designed by Chihori Shibiyama & Yano Tea is the perfect example of Japanese inspired elegance. Share the beauty of the delicate Sakura with this lovely card by Jenny Lloyd.

Geisha and Sakura Blossom

Geisha and Sakura Blossom

Finally it wouldn’t be a real garden event without some lawn ornamentation too. Here’s some gnomes courtesy of Sophie Corrigan to finish off your florals in style.

Garden Gnome Card

Garden Gnome Card

If you’ve still not got your fill of florals then fear not we’ve got a great selection of flower filled cards to help you brighten someone’s day.

Can You Name At Least 5 Women Artists For Women’s History Month?

Frida Kahlo, Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird, Nickolas Muray Collection, Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin

This March, for Women’s History Month, the National Museum of Women in the Arts are leading a social media campaign to help everyone answer the question, Can you name five women artists?

Join the museum and other institutions, including the National Gallery of Art, Brooklyn Museum of Art, and Guggenheim Bilbao, to share stories of women artists using the hashtag #5womenartists on Twitter and Instagram. Find out more about the initiative in this artnet article.

Are you interested in participating? Here are some ideas to get you started:

  1. Challenge your friends and family to name five women artists.
  2. Tell us who your favourite women artists are and why.
  3. Share a work by a woman artist at a museum or gallery near you.
  4. Explore NMWA’s artist profiles to discover artists you may not know.

To kick off the month, learn more about five women artists from the museum’s collection who broke barriers and influenced future generations:

In 1921, Alma Woodsey Thomas (1891–1978) was the first fine arts student to graduate from Howard University in Washington, D.C. During her 35-year career as a teacher at a D.C. junior high school, she was devoted to her students and organized art clubs, lectures, and student exhibitions.

Rosalba Carriera (1675–1757), a member of the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, was responsible for elevating the status of pastel from its use for sketches to a respected medium in its own right. Over the span of its existence, the Academy, which had approximately 450 members in total, only admitted 15 women.

At the age of 52, Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) and her young daughter embarked on a risky trip to the Dutch colony of Suriname in South America. She recorded indigenous flora and fauna and helped 18th-century scientists understand metamorphosis.

Hester Bateman (1709–1794) inherited her husband’s silver workshop after he died. She made the business profitable and her descendants helped the workshop thrive until the mid-19th century. The key to her success was the integration of modern technology with classical design—a cost-effective way to attract middle-class buyers.

Referenced in her New York Times obituary as the “wife of Diego Rivera, the noted painter,” Frida Kahlo (1907–1954) soared in fame posthumously. She became the first 20th-century Mexican artist to have work acquired by the Louvre. In the 1980s, numerous books were published about her work by feminist art historians and others.

— Stacy Meteer is the communications and marketing associate at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.